Unit 2A Production (part 2 lesson 5 - 7)


Lesson 5


This is the classwork files:

Here is the PowerPoint for this week:

and this is the homework: this is it as a powerpoint
and this is as a word doc


Might be a useful addition

Lesson 6


This is the classwork files:

Here is the PowerPoint for this week:

and this is the homework:

Useful links: this one about the use of sewage!
And bio-diesel and tidal power

How does carbon capture work? I didn't really know but I have more idea now




Lesson 7


This is the classwork files:

Here is the PowerPoint for this week:

and this is the homework:

If y ou are still not sure whether nuclear power is a good thing, or even if you are fairly convinced it isn’t, this is a must read article before you finally make up your mind.


Nuclear_power.png
Click here to see how the different reactors work











Keywords

Agroforestry Combining agriculture and forestry, as in the planting of windbreaks in areas suffering from wind erosion or growing trees for fuel.
alternative energy A term for energy resources, such as solar, tidal and wind power, that are renewable and offer an alternative to fossil fuels.
appropriate technology Know-how and equipment, provided as part of aid programmes, that are suited to the basic conditions prevailing in the receiving country.
arable farming A type of agriculture in which the emphasis is on the growing of crops.
biomass The total amount of living material found in a given area.
commercial farming is where the produce is grown for sale
desertification The spread of desert-like conditions into semi-arid areas.
drought A long, continuous period of dry weather.
economic sector A major division of an economy. Most commonly four sectors are recognised: primary (agriculture, fishing, mining), secondary (manufacturing), tertiary (services) and quaternary (R & D, information processing).
energy resources The means of providing motive force, heat or light. They include electricity, gas, steam and nuclear power, together with fuels such as coal, oil and wood.
extensive farming has low inputs and low outputs per hectare e.g. sheep farming on the hills or wheat prairies in Canada.
flagship project A scheme aimed at improving the image and prestige of an area, for example, the London Docklands project.
footloose industry An economic activity whose location is not controlled by any particular factor, such as raw materials, labour or markets.
foreign investment Undertaken by companies to extend their business interests overseas. It might involve creating a new source of raw materials (e.g. a mine), setting up a branch factory, opening new retail outlets or buying shares in a foreign company.
fossil fuel Combustible materials made from the fossilised remains of plants and animals, e.g. peat, coal, oil and natural gas.
free trade When trade between countries is not restricted by quotas, tariffs or the boundaries of trade blocs.
genetically modified (GM) food Food coming from crops and livestock that have been genetically engineered to improve productivity and disease-resistance. The scientific techniques include either transferring genes from one organism to another, or changing genetic materials within an organism.
global warming A slow but significant rise in the Earth’s temperature. It may be caused by the build up of excessive amounts of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere which increase the greenhouse effect.
heavy industry An industry involving large quantities of materials, such steel-making, shipbuilding and petrochemicals.
high-tech industry Manufacturing involving advanced technology, such as the making of microchips and computers. It also includes genetic engineering, communications and information technology.
Horticulture is the production of fruit, vegetables, mushrooms, flowers and ornamental plants, which has highly intensive inputs of plant, machinery and labour.
imports Goods and services brought into a country from another as part of trade.
informal sector This is largely made up of jobs over which there is little or no official control. It includes jobs such as child-minding, domestic cleaning and bar-tending.
Intensive farming is where the inputs are high to get a high level of outputs per hectare, e.g. a lot of labour is input into paddy fields get a lot of rice per hectare or in market gardening the inputs are greenhouses, machine and fertilizer.
intermediate technology The simple, easily learned and maintained technology used in a range of economic activities serving local needs in LEDCs.
irrigation The supply of water to the land by means of channels, streams and sprinklers in order to permit the growth of crops in dry areas.
LEDC An abbreviation for ‘less economically developed country’. One of a number of terms (along with ‘developing country’) used when referring to the countries of the Third World.
light industry The manufacture of products that are light in bulk and use small amounts of raw materials.
MEDC An abbreviation for ‘more economically developed country’. One of a number of terms (along with ‘developed country’) used when referring to the countries of the First World.
mixed farming A type of commercial agriculture concerned with the production of crops and the rearing of livestock on one farm.
natural resource Anything that occurs in a natural state and that is useful to people.
newly industrialising country (NIC) A term used to describe certain countries (mainly in SE Asia) which over the last 30 years have show high rates of economic development.
non-renewable resource A material that cannot be restored after use. Examples include fossil fuels and minerals.
overgrazing Putting too many animals on grazing land so that the vegetation cover is gradually destroyed.
pastoral farming A type of agriculture concerned mainly with the rearing of livestock, for meat, milk, wool or hides.
renewable resource A resource which is not diminished when it is used; it recurs and cannot be exhausted (e.g. wind and tidal energy).
resource Something which meets the needs of people.
sedentary agriculture is the majority of today’s agriculture where farmers use the same land for their lifetime.
soil erosion The removal of soil by wind and water and by the movement of soil downslope.
subsistence farming is where most of the produce is grown the consumption of the farmer and their family
shifting (or nomadic) agriculture is where the farmers move from one area to another, e.g. the Lapps in northern Norway and Finland or parts of central Africa where slash abd burn cultivation is still practiced
sustainable development A form of development involving a wise use of resources and appropriate technology without badly damaging the environment. It meets the needs of today without preventing future generations from meeting theirs.
Third World A term used rather loosely (along with ‘developing country’ and LEDC) to denote the relatively poor and less-developed countries located mainly in Africa, Asia and Latin America.
wind farm A cluster of wind-driven turbines generating electricity.
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